HomeNewsArticle Display

Medics hone wartime skills at 'Camp Snoopy'

Students in an April 17 81st Medical Group medical unit readiness training exercise put on their gas masks during a simulated chemical attack.  The 26 personnel, all in AEFs 7 and 8, took part in the training to prepare for possible deployment to Southwest Asia.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Photos by Steve Pivnick)

Students in an April 17 81st Medical Group medical unit readiness training exercise put on their gas masks during a simulated chemical attack. The 26 personnel, all in AEFs 7 and 8, took part in the training to prepare for possible deployment to Southwest Asia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Photos by Steve Pivnick)

Staff Sgt. Jessica Clarke, left, 81st Medical Support Squadron, and Senior Airman Kyle Massey, 81st Medical Operations Squadron, try to calm Staff Sgt. Christina Webbs, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron, prior to placing her on a litter.  (U.S. Sir Force photo by Steve Pivnick)

Staff Sgt. Jessica Clarke, left, 81st Medical Support Squadron, and Senior Airman Kyle Massey, 81st Medical Operations Squadron, try to calm Staff Sgt. Christina Webbs, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron, prior to placing her on a litter. (U.S. Sir Force photo by Steve Pivnick)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. -- An simulated explosion greeted the busload of 81st Medical Group medics April 17 as they neared "Camp Snoopy," set up adjacent to the medical readiness warehouse near the child development center. 

The 26 personnel, all in Air Expeditionary Forces 7 and 8, were taking part in medical unit readiness training to prepare for possible deployment to Southwest Asia.
Four instructors from 81st MDG readiness flight, led by Master Sgt. Mary Sarris, oversaw events simulating potential situations the medics might encounter during their deployment. 

The exercise scenario had the group just arriving in-country and en route to Camp Snoopy. On the way, they learned improvised explosive devices had exploded, causing 10 casualties, portrayed by actually medical group volunteers. 

While still on the bus, the medics were alerted to a possible chemical attack and donned mission-oriented protective posture gear. They remained in MOPP-4 while attending to the 10 patients. The medics sent litter teams to evaluate the patients and take them to a casualty collection point. 

Sergeant Sarris said the collection point had only minimum supplies, equipment and medical personnel. 

Once there, the medics treated the patients and called for transport to a higher level of care.