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Moulage training creates realistic scenarios

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sean Driscoll, 81st Diagnostic and Therapeutics Squadron medical lab technician, spray paints lacerations on his body during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sean Driscoll, 81st Diagnostic and Therapeutics Squadron medical lab technician, spray paints lacerations on his body during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Brandon Otwell, 81st Medical Support Squadron personnel administrator and moulage team lead, (right) shows trainees how to make an amputated limb look more realistic with the assistance of U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Josh Fairbanks, 333rd Training Squadron student, during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Brandon Otwell, 81st Medical Support Squadron personnel administrator and moulage team lead, (right) shows trainees how to make an amputated limb look more realistic with the assistance of U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Josh Fairbanks, 333rd Training Squadron student, during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Heather Winterstein, 81st Medical Support Squadron contract monitor and moulage team lead, (right) shows trainees how to effectively use a pool of blood under their injuries they've created during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. Winterstein said that the purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Heather Winterstein, 81st Medical Support Squadron contract monitor and moulage team lead, (right) shows trainees how to effectively use a pool of blood under their injuries they've created during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. Winterstein said that the purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Lori Musa, Mississippi State Department of Health emergency preparedness nurse, (left), U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeffrey Tuscany, 81st Security Forces Squadron combat arms NCO in charge, (center), and Tech. Sgt. Chris Grunert, 334th Training Squadron instructor supervisor, (right), create a compound fracture during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. Tuscany said that as a first responder having a simulation as close to real-life as possible is important so that life saving skills are second nature. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Lori Musa, Mississippi State Department of Health emergency preparedness nurse, (left), U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeffrey Tuscany, 81st Security Forces Squadron combat arms NCO in charge, (center), and Tech. Sgt. Chris Grunert, 334th Training Squadron instructor supervisor, (right), create a compound fracture during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. Tuscany said that as a first responder having a simulation as close to real-life as possible is important so that life saving skills are second nature. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Mayra Guerra, 81st Training Wing wing inspector general manager, takes a photo of her compound fractured finger she created during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Mayra Guerra, 81st Training Wing wing inspector general manager, takes a photo of her compound fractured finger she created during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

More than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities participate in moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeffrey Tuscany, 81st Security Forces Squadron combat arms NCO in charge, who attended the training, said that as a first responder having a simulation as close to real-life as possible is important so that life saving skills are second nature. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

More than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities participate in moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jeffrey Tuscany, 81st Security Forces Squadron combat arms NCO in charge, who attended the training, said that as a first responder having a simulation as close to real-life as possible is important so that life saving skills are second nature. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Allison Randall, 81st Medical Operations Squadron cardiology lab NCO in charge, adds fake blood to her finger during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Allison Randall, 81st Medical Operations Squadron cardiology lab NCO in charge, adds fake blood to her finger during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Mayra Guerra, 81st Training Wing wing inspector general manager, adds fake blood to the compound fractured knee of U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Marty Logsdon, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron medical technician, during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Mayra Guerra, 81st Training Wing wing inspector general manager, adds fake blood to the compound fractured knee of U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Marty Logsdon, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron medical technician, during moulage training inside Allee Hall on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Feb. 21, 2019. The training, which included more than 20 Keesler personnel and members from local medical facilities, was held in preparation for the upcoming joint mass casualty exercise in April. The purpose of adding moulage to "victims" is to make the scenario as realistic as possible so that first responders can treat them and react appropriately according to the injuries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. --