Keesler's #Resilience Series

#resilience video series introduction with Col. Blackwell

#resilience video series introduction with Col. Blackwell


#resilience - Col. McClure.

#resilience - Col. McClure.


#Resilience - Lt. Col. Michael Manning

#Resilience - Lt. Col. Michael Manning


#Resilience - Kemayou

#Resilience - Kemayou


#resilience - Tania Wiggins

#resilience - Tania Wiggins


#Resilience - Gradyan

#Resilience - Gradyan


#Resilience - Hale

#Resilience - Hale


#Resilience - Shellie Daniels

#Resilience - Shellie Daniels


#Resilience - Everhard

#Resilience - Everhard


#Resilience - McElroy

#Resilience - McElroy


#Resilience - Hickey

#Resilience - Hickey


Chapel Resilience Services

Suicide Prevention and Response

Ask-Care-Escort

If you have identified an airman that may be considering suicide, it’s important to Ask your Wingman directly about what’s going on. This will help you determine what needs to be done next. Ask about issues early rather than waiting for things to escalate to the point of crisis. Take all comments about suicide seriously. Be an active listener and let your Wingman tell you about their challenges. Although it can be awkward, it’s important to ask the tough questions about whether or not your Wingman is thinking about harming or killing himself. If the answer is yes, or if you even suspect that the answer is yes, don’t leave the person alone.

Care for your Wingman by calmly listening and expressing concern. Don’t be judgmental or promise secrecy. If your Wingman is having thoughts of suicide, you need to act. Remove anything he could use to hurt himself and immediately seek help.

The final step is to Escort your Wingman immediately to the nearest emergency room, Mental Health Clinic, chaplain, or primary care clinic, and contact the supervisor or chain of command. If a distressed Airman refuses help or you're not sure what to do, call your supervisor or 911 for help. Never leave an Airman who is having thoughts of suicide alone, even to go to the bathroom.