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CMSAF highlights mentorship during virtual panel

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jonathan Talley, 81st Security Forces Squadron logistics superintendent attends the virtual panel 'From Good to Great through Personal Perspective: A Panel of Mentors' inside the security forces building at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, May 25, 2021. The panel was hosted by the Air Education Training Command Mentoring Council and featured Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass, who provided her personal perspective on mentorship. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Spencer Tobler)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jonathan Talley, 81st Security Forces Squadron logistics superintendent attends the virtual panel 'From Good to Great through Personal Perspective: A Panel of Mentors' inside the security forces building at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, May 25, 2021. The panel was hosted by the Air Education Training Command Mentoring Council and featured Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass, who provided her personal perspective on mentorship. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Spencer Tobler)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. --

The Air Education Training Command Mentoring Council hosted the second virtual mentorship panel ‘From Good to Great through Personal Perspective: A Panel of Mentors’ May 25.

During this panel, Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force JoAnne S. Bass, along with other senior enlisted leaders, shared her stories and personal perspective on mentoring and the impact it’s had on her life.

Master Sgt. Jonathan Talley, 81st Security Forces Squadron logistics superintendent, was a moderator for the panel.

“We were looking at why bases should establish mentorship programs and how it would benefit the total force,” said Talley. “It was an honor for me to be part of an event that’s helping change Air Force culture.”

During the symposium, panel members touched on subjects ranging from what a mentor looks like to mental health awareness.

“To see these great leaders open up about their struggles and weaknesses really put things into perspective,” said Talley. “It just shows that everyone has their struggles, no matter who you are and you should have enough courage to reach out to someone.”

 AETC continues to strive towards establishing a culture of mentorship.

“Pushing mentorship and communicating  why it’s important to find someone to help guide you, personally and professionally, is the intent behind events like this,” said Talley. “I believe we are meeting that intent.”