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Cooler dorms now with snacks

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, empties a dehumidifier inside Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, empties a dehumidifier inside Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, empties a dehumidifier inside Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, empties a dehumidifier inside Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, uses a vending machine at Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Chris Robinson, Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical technician, uses a vending machine at Biloxi Hall at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Aug. 13, 2020. Vending machines and dehumidifiers were provided to the permanent party dorms to improve the health and living standards of the Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seth Haddix)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. --

Over 300 Airmen live in the permanent party dorms and play a critical role in supporting the mission. The 81st Training Wing strives to create the best living standards for the Airmen, and the dorm office has recently been adapting to the environment.

Tech. Sgt. Tiffany Selmon, 81st Civil Engineering Squadron Airman dorm leader, ordered new vending machines containing healthy food and snacks as well as dehumidifiers for the dorm rooms.

“The new appliances are ways to improve the life at the dorms,” said Selmon. “The energy and environment of the dorms are always changing, and with certain restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, comfortability and healthy alternatives for food are our priorities.”

As a member living in the dorms, Airman Alejandro Stephen, 81st Comptroller Squadron customer service technician, values comfortability.

“Most Airmen are away from home so it is important to make these Airmen as comfortable as possible,” said Stephen.

The Keesler Airman’s Council aims to continue communication with leadership to support this community. The council serves as a central hub for Airmen at Keesler to voice their needs and concerns directly to the Dorm Management Office and leadership to help better their living conditions.  

“Seeing the changes being made makes us feel like leadership cares about us,” said Airman Noah Magruder, 81st CPTS customer service technician and member of the council. “The council wants to continue working with leadership to improve our home.”

Selmon values the Airmen and their importance. The Dorm Management Office, along with the support of wing leadership, has made it a priority to promote positive health and welfare for the junior enlisted force at Keesler starting at the place they call home.

“I am passionate about taking care of our Airmen,” said Selmon. “Providing a welcoming environment and home not only impacts them but the mission. We strive to elevate ideas and communication to show the Airmen we care about them.”