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Physical therapy keeps Airmen in the fight

Cheryl Barnes-Sipp, wife of retired Tech. Sgt. Donald Sipp, exhales as Senior Airman Wesley McCool, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medical technician, works on her shoulder joint mobility in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016 Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. McCool is using a technique called passive joint mobilization, which helps increases the range of motion of a specific joint by having the technician move the client’s limb for them. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Cheryl Barnes-Sipp, wife of retired Tech. Sgt. Donald Sipp, exhales as Senior Airman Wesley McCool, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medical technician, works on her shoulder joint mobility in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016 Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. McCool is using a technique called passive joint mobilization, which helps increases the range of motion of a specific joint by having the technician move the client’s limb for them. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Darien Darland, Keesler Marine Detachment weather instructor, swings battle ropes while balancing on one leg in the physical therapy department, April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. When recovering from a leg injury, balancing on one leg can be difficult. As clients progress in their therapy, technicians increase exercise difficulty. Incorporating battle ropes into a single leg stability exercise adds an extra challenge to the client. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Darien Darland, Keesler Marine Detachment weather instructor, swings battle ropes while balancing on one leg in the physical therapy department, April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. When recovering from a leg injury, balancing on one leg can be difficult. As clients progress in their therapy, technicians increase exercise difficulty. Incorporating battle ropes into a single leg stability exercise adds an extra challenge to the client. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Sharay Windham, 81st Medical Support Squadron licensed physical therapist assistant, takes notes as Master Sgt. Byron Self, 81st Security Forces Squadron flight chief, runs on an anti-gravity treadmill in the Physical Therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The anti-gravity treadmill is used to help rehabilitate clients who have injuries to their lower limbs by decreasing the amount of weight on the client’s joints which helps with recovery after injury or surgery. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Sharay Windham, 81st Medical Support Squadron licensed physical therapist assistant, takes notes as Master Sgt. Byron Self, 81st Security Forces Squadron flight chief, runs on an anti-gravity treadmill in the Physical Therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The anti-gravity treadmill is used to help rehabilitate clients who have injuries to their lower limbs by decreasing the amount of weight on the client’s joints which helps with recovery after injury or surgery. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Jennifer Divis, Rocky Mountain University physical therapy intern, applies pressure to the lower back of Master Sgt. Edmon James, 335th Training Squadron instructor supervisor, in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Applying pressure helps reduce the pain James experiences by increasing the flexibility of his lower back. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Jennifer Divis, Rocky Mountain University physical therapy intern, applies pressure to the lower back of Master Sgt. Edmon James, 335th Training Squadron instructor supervisor, in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Applying pressure helps reduce the pain James experiences by increasing the flexibility of his lower back. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Senior Airman April Smith, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medicine specialist, examines Lt. Col. Thomas Shaak, 81st Medical Support Squadron clinical research lab director, as he balances on one leg in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Shaak is working on his ability to balance and stabilize his knee by standing on a foam pad and throwing a ball into a trampoline. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Senior Airman April Smith, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medicine specialist, examines Lt. Col. Thomas Shaak, 81st Medical Support Squadron clinical research lab director, as he balances on one leg in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Shaak is working on his ability to balance and stabilize his knee by standing on a foam pad and throwing a ball into a trampoline. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Tech. Sgt. Link Collier, 334th Training Squadron airfield management instructor supervisor, executes a front raise in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Performing a front (anterior) raise with a resistance band helps build strength in Collier’s injured shoulder. The exercise is performed on both sides in order to maintain balance. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Tech. Sgt. Link Collier, 334th Training Squadron airfield management instructor supervisor, executes a front raise in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Performing a front (anterior) raise with a resistance band helps build strength in Collier’s injured shoulder. The exercise is performed on both sides in order to maintain balance. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Physical medicine technicians, specialists and interns work with their clients in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. There are currently 10 interns that perform the bulk of the evaluations and re-evaluations under the supervision of permanent party physical therapists. The physical therapy department treats an average of 160 clients daily. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Physical medicine technicians, specialists and interns work with their clients in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. There are currently 10 interns that perform the bulk of the evaluations and re-evaluations under the supervision of permanent party physical therapists. The physical therapy department treats an average of 160 clients daily. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Senior Airman Wesley McCool, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medical technician, works on Chaplain (Col.) David Terrinoni, 81st Training Wing chaplain, in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. McCool is working on Terrinoni’s toe mobilization by pulling his toe away, then curling and extending the toe to improve its range of motion. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Senior Airman Wesley McCool, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medical technician, works on Chaplain (Col.) David Terrinoni, 81st Training Wing chaplain, in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. McCool is working on Terrinoni’s toe mobilization by pulling his toe away, then curling and extending the toe to improve its range of motion. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Wayne Williams, 81st Medical Support Squadron bio-medical technician, squeezes a grip strength machine in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. This machine is used to measure the maximum hand strength on both the affected and non-affected limb. Physical medicine technicians then use this number as a baseline to work toward balancing the strength in both limbs. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Wayne Williams, 81st Medical Support Squadron bio-medical technician, squeezes a grip strength machine in the physical therapy department April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. This machine is used to measure the maximum hand strength on both the affected and non-affected limb. Physical medicine technicians then use this number as a baseline to work toward balancing the strength in both limbs. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

Tech. Sgt. Angela Withrow, 81st Operations Support Flight contracting officer representative, peddles a stationary bike in the physical therapy department, April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The stationary bike is used to increase blood flow to the legs and helps increase hip, knee and ankle range of motion. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)
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Tech. Sgt. Angela Withrow, 81st Operations Support Flight contracting officer representative, peddles a stationary bike in the physical therapy department, April 7, 2016, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The stationary bike is used to increase blood flow to the legs and helps increase hip, knee and ankle range of motion. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. -- Cheryl Barnes-Sipp, wife of retired Tech. Sgt. Donald Sipp, exhales as Senior Airman Wesley McCool, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron physical medical technician, works on her shoulder joint mobility in the physical therapy department, April 6, 2016 Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. McCool is using a technique called passive joint mobilization, which helps increases the range of motion of a specific joint by having the technician move the client’s limb for them. (Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Travis Beihl)