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From the fleet to the classroom: Sailor stays dedicated to helping others

U.S. Navy Aerographer’s Mate 1st Class Michael Ramos, Center for Naval Aviation Training Unit severe convective weather course instructor, stands outside the Weather Training Complex observatory July 21, 2016, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Ramos teaches his students the basics of naval weather training while also showing them how coming together as a unit in a joint military environment makes accomplishing the mission easier. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Holly Mansfield/Released)

U.S. Navy Aerographer’s Mate 1st Class Michael Ramos, Center for Naval Aviation Training Unit severe convective weather course instructor, stands outside the Weather Training Complex observatory July 21, 2016, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Ramos teaches his students the basics of naval weather training while also showing them how coming together as a unit in a joint military environment makes accomplishing the mission easier. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Holly Mansfield/Released)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. --

Since Oct. 13, 1775, the U.S. Navy has carried their core values of honor, courage and commitment to help each Sailor succeed in their career.

Two hundred thirty eight years after the naval service began, Sailors like Aerographer’s Mate 1st Class Michael Ramos are passing on those core values in Keesler’s joint military environment.

“I’ve learned a lot from the Air Force since I’ve been here and how it compares to the Navy,” said Ramos, Center for Naval Aviation Training Unit severe convective weather course instructor. “I’ve made friends with Airmen and Marines who have embraced and taken the time to learn about me and the Navy. It sounds cliché but it takes extra effort to learn about others instead of judging a book by its cover. It’s a joint mission so the more we know about each other the stronger we will be.”

After 10 years of working in Naval Special Warfare, instructing here has helped Ramos step his game up with being a more professional Sailor and striving to develop his students and peers into leaders in the Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.

“Coming here to Keesler has helped me improve as a military member,” said Ramos. “Every day is a challenge. It’s great learning how to take care of my fellow Sailors in a training environment because each Sailor has their own challenges, issues and personality. It’s an opportunity for me to influence my rate (career field) in the Navy and my peers in other branches."

His hard work and passion for what the Navy stands for has helped not only Ramos succeed but also leaves a lasting impact on his students.

“He’s very personable and connects with students on an individual level,” said Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark Hoffman, CNATTU meteorology and oceanography department chief. “He employs a leadership style that inspires and motivates, add those together and you get an extremely effective instructor and leader. He’s the ultimate team player and his commitment to excellence, personality and leadership style is recognized and frequently emulated.”

Keeping with the Navy core values and what he’s learned from his leadership, Ramos has become part of the team dedicated to insuring each Sailor is taken care of in the classroom and at home.

“How we pull together to accomplish our training mission here in the weather school is amazing,” said Ramos. “Everyone from our commanding officer to our chiefs, I’ve never seen such a great group of people who will go out of their way to help each person and bring unity to the command. Every person looks after each other.”

Over the span of his career Ramos has strived to help and inspire each Sailor he has met from the fleet all the way to the classroom. He attributes his passion for helping others to the lifestyle the Navy has built for its Sailors.

“I don’t regret any part of being in the Navy,” said Ramos. “This is the only lifestyle I’ve known since high school and I can’t imagine doing anything else. I’ve given everything to the Navy because of what it gives me. Every opportunity and person I’ve met I’ve learned from and I’m grateful for that. For 238 years this mentality of helping people has been working and I don’t see the Navy or its Sailors stopping it now.”